Read LinkedIn’s action plan to boost employee happiness, decrease burnout, and make sure its workers truly feel like they belong there

News

2016 10 19T120000Z_31163539_S1BEUHXHGGAA_RTRMADP_3_CZECH USA CYBERCRIME LINKEDIN.JPG

A chaotic year, complete with an historic civil rights movement and a global pandemic, is having a major impact on what employees are seeking from a job.
Perks like free beer aren’t enough anymore. Instead, workers are craving less tangible benefits from employers.
The sense of “belonging” in a company, for example, translated to a 12% growth in worker happiness over the past three months, according to new data released on Wednesday from LinkedIn’s Glint.
White men currently have the highest median belonging scores of any gender or racial group, while Black and Asian women score the lowest, according to a new study from the Center for Talent Innovation.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A historic civil rights movement and global pandemic that completely changed day-to-day life are both having a major impact on what people are looking for in an employer.

More individuals are seeking less tangible benefits from organizations instead of perks like ping pong tables and free beer. The sense of “belonging” in a company, for example, translated to a 12% growth in worker happiness over the past three months, according to new data released on Wednesday from Glint — an employee engagement firm that was purchased by LinkedIn in 2018.

“People during this time, they’re going within,” Scott Shute, the head of mindfulness and compassion at LinkedIn, told Business Insider. “When there’s a lot of chaos, people challenge their own beliefs and they challenge their own assumptions. And they know that they need to help themselves.”

Belonging at work not only benefits the worker, but the organization as a whole. Employees that feel like they belong say they feel “very engaged at work,” per a survey of 3,711 professionals conducted by the nonprofit Center for Talent Innovation. The CTI study also found that employees who feel they belong plan to stay at their company for at least two years and would recommend their job to other people.

  Goldman Sachs cuts US GDP estimate, now sees economy shrinking 4.6% in 2020

But not everyone feels like they belong in today’s workplaces: white men have the highest median belonging scores of any gender or racial group, while Black and Asian women score the lowest.

Companies can better foster belonging for employees who may feel neglected through “operationalizing compassion,” or ensuring employees treat each other with dignity during the workday, according to Shute.


“My job is to operationalize compassion and we see that compassion happens at the individual level …read more

Source:: Business Insider

(Visited 4 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *