Coronavirus aid should be based on need, not on Trump’s fragile ego


trump coronavirus

Trump just survived an impeachment over demanding a quid pro quo from a foreign leader. He’s followed that up by implying governors in coronavirus-stricken states need to be nice to him to receive federal aid.

A president should never be able to make such a threat.

Congress should always demand oversight over the dispersal of aid, and there should be an inspector general keeping an eye on politically-motivated shenanigans.

The former proprietor of several bankrupt casinos loves to talk about his negotiating prowess, so it’s possible that his sociopathic indifference to people’s lives isn’t as disgusting as it appears. Maybe to Trump, it’s just business.
This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

What do you do if you’re a president who just survived an impeachment trial over a quid pro quo demand to a foreign leader?

Evidently, you state outrightly that governors need to “treat you well” for their states to receive coronavirus disaster relief.

Or at least you do when you’re President Trump, who just months after being impeached for trying to solicit political favors from a foreign leader said the process of the federal government providing desperately needed resources to coronavirus-inundated states is a “two-way street.”

“They have to treat us well also. They can’t say, ‘Oh gee, we should get this, we should get that,'” the president asserted on Tuesday during a Fox News town hall. Unable to help himself, the president added, “We’re doing a great job.”

In a country not presided over by such an insecure and thin-skinned bully, the “two-way street” would be local leaders telling the federal government what kind of help they need, and the federal government reciprocating by offering as much aid as it can based on the needs of the state and the available resources.

But Trump doesn’t see it that way.

Democrats, in particular, must supplicate themselves at the knee of the president as a pre-condition for receiving aid.

There’s a Latin phrase for that kind of arrangement.

A president should never be able to make such a threat. It should be the standard operating system for Congress to have oversight over the dispersal of congressionally-authorized aid, and there should be an inspector general keeping an eye on any politically-motivated shenanigans.


That this is even possible is a flaw in the system, and that his comment wasn’t met with universal …read more

Source:: Business Insider

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *