A top C-suite headhunter who’s placed more than 100 execs in major companies shares his favorite job interview questions — and the answers he’s looking for


Roger Duguay

Roger Duguay is a managing partner and global practice leader for CEO and board services for Boyden, one of the world’s top executive-search firms.
Duguay uses job interviews to find candidates who are self-assured without being cocky.
He wants career qualifications to be a prerequisite for having the interview in the first place, and for the conversation to be an opportunity to assess the candidate’s personality.
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As managing partner at Boyden, one of the world’s top executive-search firms, Roger Duguay has had countless interviews with aspiring captains of industry. His approach to finding top talent has proven so successful that Boyden’s CEO appointed him leader of the firm’s global CEO and board services practice last year.

This approach includes a break from traditional job interviews. “To me the fact that you’ve done a good job in the last five, 10 years is not a guarantee anymore you will be the good candidate two years from now,” Duguay told Business Insider. Because business across all industries has been changing so rapidly in recent years, he said, he instead looks for signals that the candidate is adaptable and curious.

Over his time at Boyden, Duguay has placed more than 100 people into executive, CEO, or board roles in both the private and the public sector. (He estimated he’d gone through 1,000 candidates.) When he’s looking for a CEO, he’ll give a two-hour interview with his top candidates. He shared with us some of his favorite questions. And while Duguay uses them to find a new head of a company, they are just as valuable for any experienced hire.

“Tell me about your personal life.”

Duguay doesn’t necessarily ask this one so directly, but he’s getting at what they’re like outside the office. This includes things like how they spend their weekends, or even what they’re reading.

“I’m going to ask a lot more questions that are going to tell me about the human being behind the role,” he said. “Not what you’ve done and what university you’ve been to.” When Duguay is interviewing someone, skills required for the job in question are a prerequisite for even being in the room.

“If you had to do it all over again, is there anything in the last five years you would do differently?”


“If you’re not able to tell me five …read more

Source:: Business Insider

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