Despite being home to fewer than 5 million people, experts say New Zealand has an “active” white supremacist community

Police and ambulance staff help a wounded man from outside a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019.  A witness says many people have been killed in a mass shooting at a mosque in the New Zealand city of Christchurch. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

At least 49 people were killed in a deadly attack in New Zealand on Friday after a shooter opened fire at worshippers praying in two mosques in the city of Christchurch.
So far, a 28-year-old man has been arrested in connection with the attack. The gunman is believed to have published a 74-page white nationalist manifesto before the rampage, and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison described the shooter as an “extremist, right wing” terrorist.
While New Zealand is generally considered a place of tolerance, white supremacy exists in the island nation. Former intelligence and defense policy analyst Paul Buchanan told Radio New Zealand that Christchurch is home to an active white supremacist community.
“It shows that we don’t live in a benign environment,” Buchanan said. “We’ve been affected with the virus of extremism.”

Dozens of people were killed on Friday in a deadly attack after a shooter opened fire at worshippers at two mosques in the city of Christchurch in New Zealand, killing at least 49 people and injuring 48 others according to police.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described the rampage as one of New Zealand’s darkest days, adding that “it is clear that this can now only be described as a terrorist attack.”

So far, a 28-year-old man has been arrested and charged in connection with the onslaught. Just before the attack, an account believed to be linked to the gunman, under the name Brenton Tarrant, posted a 74-page white nationalist manifesto titled “The Great Replacement.” A copy of the document, reviewed by INSIDER, includes anti-immigration rhetoric; a “white genocide” theory that is a key component of white nationalist ideology; and support for Dylann Roof, who killed nine African-Americans at a church in Charleston, South Carolina in 2015, and Anders Breivik, a Norwegian white nationalist who killed 77 people in 2011.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison described the gunman, an Australian national, as an “extremist, right-wing” terrorist.

Friday’s shooting shocked New Zealand, a South Pacific country of fewer than 5 million people, generally viewed as a beacon of tolerance and where gun shootings aren’t common. In the manifesto, the gunman wrote that he chose the island nation to prove that “no where in the world was safe, the invaders were in all of our lands, even in the remotest areas of the world.”

Yet, according to former intelligence and defense policy analyst Paul Buchanan, Christchurch is home to an active white supremacist community.

Buchanan, currently the …read more

Source:: Business Insider

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *