Video game review: ‘Unravel Two’ doubles fun with second hero


E3 is about what’s to come. It’s a time when gamers board the hype train that takes them to the frenzied fall season. Very few games are actually announced and launched the same day as E3, but Electronic Arts broke rank and did just that with “Unravel Two.”

The move is a double-edged sword for developer Coldwood Interactive. E3 news briefings attract a huge audience and are poured over like Super Bowl ads. At the same time, “Unravel Two” risks being drowned out by bigger names such as “Cyberpunk 2077” or “The Last of Us Part II.”

Those who are immediately drawn to the lush visuals of “Unravel Two” will find a sequel that maintains the charm of the original, while also adding new elements. Yarny returns, but this time, it has an additional friend for the journey. That means the campaign can be played solo or cooperatively with a friend on the couch. The two Yarnys are key for the follow-up, as the gameplay revolves around teamwork and puzzle-solving.

In the original, players learned how Yarny could swing around the world like Spider-Man by tossing its string onto latch points. Elsewhere, they discovered that Yarny could create tightrope bridges by tying one string to the end of a chasm, leaping across, and attaching it to the other side.

All those skills come into play in the sequel and already make it an inventive platformer, but the second Yarny adds a new dimension to the gameplay. With a second hero, players have a moving anchor that lets one hero hold the string while the other jumps toward a ledge. Once the partner is up there, it can pull up the ally so they can both continue.

As players progress through the seven chapters of “Unravel Two,” they’ll encounter other scenarios, in which having two Yarnys is helpful. In one case, a chicken is chasing them and one Yarny must distract the hen while the other maneuvers around and helps with the escape. Another puzzle area requires one Yarny to activate a switch, while the other figures out the rest of the obstacle.

The two-player gameplay is inventive, but it takes plenty of coordination to maneuver around platforms and traps. With puzzles, the added layer of complexity makes them more difficult as players have to figure out how to avoid tangles and getting the most out of the limited string.

Playing cooperatively, the challenge lies …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Entertainment

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