National Zoo welcomes ‘incredible’ birth of baby gorilla


Click here to see video of mom and baby after birth

By Michael E. Ruane and Dana Hedgpeth | The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Becky Malinsky was on duty in the National Zoo’s Great Ape House a little after 1 p.m. Sunday when she decided to check on the zoo’s very pregnant western lowland gorilla, Calaya.

Malinsky, the assistant curator of primates, noticed that Calaya looked restless and uncomfortable, and then she saw the animal’s water break. Malinsky got on the phone with her supervisor: “I think this is something,” she said.

For the next five hours, keepers and curators at the zoo watched, and filmed, the 15-year-old gorilla endure labor and then give birth to her first offspring, a male named Moke (pronounced Mo-KEY), which means “junior” or “little one” in the Lingala language of Africa.

Members of the zoo staff said it was an amazing event. The zoo’s other gorillas hovered nearby. And after the baby was born, his 450-pound father, Baraka, uttered a “pleasure rumble,” a sign of contentment, the zoo said.

“I never thought I would get to witness a gorilla baby being born,” Malinsky said Monday. “Quite incredible.”

Meredith Bastian, the zoo’s curator of primates, said:

“We all saw everything. We saw the birth. We saw the five hours of labor. . . . We were all kind of shaking a little with happiness. It was an amazing moment to share with the team. We were all really close to tears.”

The baby, the first such gorilla born at the zoo in nine years, arrived at 6:25 p.m. Video footage shows Calaya cradling him in her huge hands and cleaning him seconds after he was born.

Bastian said the staff watched as Calaya’s birth contractions became more frequent, and she picked up a blanket at several points, as if for help.

“She was doing a lot of pacing and walking around,” she said. “She grabbed lots of blankets. . . . She would wrap herself in them. She would use them to brace herself a little bit as she was pushing.”

Baraka, the father, is a hulking “silverback,” so called because of the gray hair on his broad back. He “stayed in the room with her, but was at a respectful distance,” Bastian said.

The baby’s male sex was confirmed Monday morning. He looks strong and healthy, Bastian said: “He’s vocal already. . . . He’s cried, and she . . . reacts.”

The two adult …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Lifestyle

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