REVIEW: ‘Westworld’ fans will love the violent delights and new mysteries offered up on season 2


Dolores Westworld Season 2 photos 17

Warning: Minor spoilers ahead for the second season of “Westworld.”

The premiere season of HBO’s sci-fi/western thriller “Westworld” captivated millions with its mystery box narratives and compelling characters, but there was legitimate concern about the magic staying alive for a second round.

After reviewing the first five episodes of the second season, I believe fans should trust co-creators Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy with this ambitious story more than ever.

“Westworld” returns after the dramatic first season finale that brought about the death of Anthony Hopkins’ character, Dr. Robert Ford, and the start of a robot/host revolution in the park. The story moves forward quickly in what’s already become the show’s predictably unpredictable fashion.

Why you should care: “Westworld” is one of HBO’s best original series.

As HBO looks to fill in the gaping chasm “Game of Thrones” will leave behind in 2019, “Westworld” remains a strong contender. The high production value and incredible talent both in front of and behind the camera carries the second season into a strong start.

Composer Ramin Djawadi’s score continues to build on itself with ominous musical cues (and yes, more piano pop song covers). The costuming and set design are on also on par with the best of peak TV.

What’s hot: The world-building and character arcs are on point.

One of my favorite things about the first season’s narrative arc was how the story zoomed out more and more with each episode. Starting with the day-to-day activities of the park itself, we slowly learned more about the Delos facility and how all of the human and host characters function as entertainment and employees.

The second season furthers this practice in an even more intriguing way. Now that several hosts — like Dolores and Bernard — are fully conscious, they have complete access to all of their memories. But the hosts’ memory doesn’t work in the same way as it does with mere humans.

The hosts’ memories are nearly impossible to differentiate from something happening to them in the present. This is woven carefully into episodes by serving to confuse some hosts into not knowing where or “when” they are.

But more importantly, it allows “Westworld” to give the audience more flashbacks and background on human characters you know from the first season. We won’t give much here, but if you were disappointed with the fast-forward montage showing Williams’ transformation …read more

Source:: Business Insider

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