Stephen Hawking, the world’s most famous physicist, dies at age of 76

Stephen Hawking

British physicist Stephen Hawking, shown here delivering a speech at George Washington University in 2008, has passed away at the age of 76. (NASA Photo / Paul E. Alers)

Stephen Hawking, the British physicist who became famous for his way-out theories and for overcoming debilitating disease, has died at the age of 76, his children said in a statement tonight.

“We are deeply saddened that our beloved father passed away today,” the statement read. “He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work and legacy will live on for many years.”

Hawking had to cope with neurodegenerative disease since graduate school, and has been confined to a wheelchair for decades. In his latter years, he could communicate only by blinking his eyes to control a computer and a digitally simulated voice.

Nevertheless, he achieved a level of fame that few scientists in history have attained. His life was the subject of an award-winning movie, “The Theory of Everything.” His book about cosmology, “A Brief History of Time,” became a bestseller.

He never received a Nobel Prize, but his theories about the nature of black holes and spacetime contributed to Nobel-winning discoveries such as the first-ever direct detection of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO.

One of Hawking’s best-known scientific contributions is the concept of Hawking radiation — the idea that black holes radiate a trickle of energy due to the quantum nature of spacetime.

His base of operations was Cambridge University in Britain, but he traveled widely around the world. Hawking’s most recent high-profile trip to Seattle came in 2012. During that trip, he gave a lecture at the Paramount Theater, went sightseeing and visited with family and friends.

While visiting Seattle, Stephen Hawking was asked how he’d describe his quality of life in light of his long struggle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He told journalists that his life was actually “pretty good”:

“I have been very successful in my scientific work, and have become one of the best-known scientists in the world,” he said. “I have three children, and three grandchildren so far. I travel widely, have been to Antarctica and have met the presidents of Korea, China, India, Ireland, Chile and the United States. I have been down in a submarine, and up in a zero-gravity flight in preparation for the flight into space that I’m hoping to make on Virgin Galactic.

“Despite my disability, I have managed to do most things …read more

Source:: GeekWire

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