How Medicaid became a go-to funder for schools


OAKLAND — Gerardo Alejandrez used to punch classmates, throw chairs and curse at his teachers, conduct that forced him to switch from school to school. “I had a lot of anger issues,” the 16-year-old said recently.

Then Gerardo entered a class at Oakland Technical High School for students who have mental health or behavior issues. In that classroom, the teacher gets support from Erich Roberts, a psychiatric social worker assigned to the group. Oakland Unified School District bills Medicaid, the nation’s insurance program for low-income residents, for Roberts’ services.

Those payments officially cover the time he spends — in and out of the classroom — providing therapy and other assistance for nine Medicaid-covered youths as well as meeting with their family members. Roberts’ presence in the classroom is also an asset for the teacher and four other kids in the class who are not on government insurance. Many of the students in the class would likely drop out without the extra help, Roberts said.

Medicaid, created in 1965 to provide health insurance to the poor, now functions as a lifeline for millions of American students such as Gerardo — whose grades have improved and who wants to become a fashion designer — as well as hundreds of school districts across the country like Oakland Unified. The public insurance program has evolved so that it now finances myriad education-related services, including transportation for kids with disabilities, school clinics and counseling for children from turbulent backgrounds.

But as Congress seeks to cut federal health spending, critics question whether the educational system has become too reliant on the health program. Educators and advocates counter that schools are the opportune place to address health-related issues and that federal law requires them to provide such benefits. And, they say, if Medicaid doesn’t pay, who will?

With a Republican administration vowing to trim Medicaid, Kaiser Health News is examining how the U.S. has evolved into a “Medicaid Nation,” where huge swaths of Americans rely on the program, directly and indirectly, often unknowingly. Medicaid’s role in schools is a telling example.

Medicaid spends only $4 billion of its $400 billion annual budget in schools — a “very small portion of the pie,” said Jessica Schubel, a senior policy analyst at the bipartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. But for the school districts providing an array of services that have quietly become vital to students and families, losing this funding source would be …read more

Source:: The Mercury News – Health

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