How to raise an Olympian, according to the parents of gold medalist Mikaela Shiffrin


mikaela shiffrin wins

• Olympic gold medalist Mikaela Shiffrin is a favorite in alpine skiing at this year’s Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

• She also won gold in Sochi in 2014, at the age of 18. becoming the youngest person to win an Olympic gold medal in the slalom.

• Shiffrin’s parents introduced her and her brother to the sport at a young age.

Olympic gold medalist Mikaela Shiffrin’s interest in skiing didn’t just come out of nowhere.

Her parents — anesthesiologist Jeff and former nurse Eileen — were both avid skiers growing up, and later took up Masters racing.

And they introduced Shiffrin and her older brother Taylor to the sport at the early age. “They had us walking around the living room in these tiny, little, plastic Mickey Mouse skis that you just latched onto snow boots,” Taylor told The New York Post.

Flash forward two decades, and their World Cup-winning daughter is now on the verge of potentially making history at the Pyeongchang Games. She could become the first American woman to win three skiing medals at one Olympics, The Denver Post reported.

Shiffrin herself told The New York Times that she doesn’t think there’s a proper way to raise an Olympic champion, in that the “crazy path” she took “could not be replicated.”

Still, it’s interesting to look back at the steps the Shiffrins took to instill killer skiing skills and an intense work ethic in their daughter.

SEE ALSO: How 22-year-old American Olympian Mikaela Shiffrin, called ‘the next Lindsey Vonn,’ became the world’s best slalom skier

Writing in The New Yorker, Nick Paumgarten declared Shiffrin an “example of nurture over nature, of work over talent.” From an early age, the athlete has been driven to put in the training it takes to become a dominant skier.

Source: The New Yorker, Business Insider

Having introduced both of their young children to the sport, the Shiffrins began to ski together as a family. Both Shiffrin and her brother Taylor have said they never felt pressured to ski. For them, it was often just a matter of following their parents down the slopes.

Source: Sports Illustrated

“It’s not a throw into the deep end, like okay go for it, it’s a gentle progression, like we’re going to develop their abilities, develop their proprioceptive nerve endings and once they …read more

Source:: Business Insider

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